Healthy skin in a healthy body

Fighting inflammatory states in our body is essential for our health. Inflammation is a risk that is always lurking, and it also reflects on the appearance of our skin.

The human body is a complex machine that functions as a result of numerous metabolic, macroscopic processes at the cellular level. But any highly composite machine requires careful maintenance.

To keep the body functioning at its best, it is essential to safeguard our health, which depends on numerous factors, such as lifestyle, the quantity of stress we are subjected to, diet, genetic predisposition, the place in which we live and other environmental factors. With some of these elements we do not have much room for manoeuvre, but with others we can intervene at any time.

For example, we can actively decide to improve our lifestyle and diet. We can adopt less sedentary habits and exercise regularly, and we can choose a diet that favours fresh, seasonal products over processed foods. All these choices will ensure that our body preserves its natural capacity to eliminate toxins and waste elements, so they do not accumulate in our organism, contributing to the state of inflammation.

Inflammation is a silent enemy

An incorrect diet, in fact, can have a detrimental effect on our wellbeing and energy levels. It is no coincidence that redness, blemishes, and skin inflammation often appear when our lifestyle and diet lack in quality. Everything inside us is interconnected. And every internal motion of our body is infallibly reflected on the surface of our skin. This means that if our aim is to have beautiful, healthy skin, we cannot ignore the health of our body.

A constantly imbalanced diet can exacerbate or generate inflammation in our body, which may become chronic and generate problems and disorders if it is not recognised and remedied. Recent studies have demonstrated with increasing frequency a close link between a permanent state of inflammation in the body and the appearance of a range of illnesses from skin autoimmune diseases to some forms of cancer.

Inflammation can also be accelerated by situations of physical and emotional stress, and in this case it has been studied as a risk factor in the development of psychopathologies.

How can we prevent inflammation?

As we have already said, an effective way of preventing and fighting inflammatory states in our organism is to adjust our eating habits. By carefully choosing a balanced diet we can do a lot to reinforce our defences against inflammation. There are foods that by their very nature help trigger inflammatory processes and should therefore be avoided or eaten only rarely. These include:

  • refined carbohydrates
  • refined sugars and foods with a high glycemic index
  • red meat
  • sugar-sweetened and carbonated beverages
  • fried food

Not surprisingly, most of these foods have already been recognised as problematic for the body’s general health and are usually not recommended in any diet or eating regimen.

But, just as there are foods that accelerate inflammation, there are also foods that fight it very effectively. These include:

  • omega-rich fish
  • tomatoes
  • olive oil
  • dried fruit
  • leafy vegetables

A diet that takes into account these indications will be a valid help in protecting our organism from the risks of long-term inflammation. To this we can add the use of nutraceuticals that provide excellent supplementary support, as long as they are technologically advanced and formulated for safe and effective daily use.

The benefits of an anti-inflammatory diet are not limited to improving our physical health, though, as they also affect our mood and state of mind by generally increasing our quality of life. 

Sources

Charles Raison, Introduction: The inflammation Connection, in “Psychiatric Times” Apr 30 2018 https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/introduction-inflammation-connection

Philip Hunter, The inflammation theory of disease, in “EMBO Report”, 2012
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3492709/

Foods that fight inflammation, in “Harvard Health Publishing”, updated Aug 29 2020
https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/foods-that-fight-inflammation

Davis Health, Western diet rich in fat and sugar linked to skin inflammation, in “Science Daily”, Feb 18 2020
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/02/200218161720.htm

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